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Cheers! Your Evening Drink May Work As Antidepressant


There are some drinks that can help people feel better with clinical depression, is the performance normal? Yes, at least in biochemistry. Researchers have found that alcohol produces the same neurological and molecular changes that have been shown to be rapidly acting as antidepressants.


"Because of the high degree of co-morbidity between major depression and alcoholism, there is a wide acceptance of self-medication hypotheses, suggesting that depressed individuals may turn to drinking as a means to treat their depression," lead researcher Kimberly Rab- M, Associate Professor of Physiology and Pharmacology at Wake Forest School, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, part of the Institute of Physiology and Pharmacology.


"We now have biochemical and behavioral data to support this hypothesis," he said, adding that does not mean that alcohol can be seen as an effective treatment for depression.


"There is definitely a danger of having self-medication with alcohol. There is also a beneficial and detrimental fine line and it becomes addictive at some point during the repeated use of self-medication." - Graham The paper points out that the Journal of Communication on Nature.


In a study using animal models, Rab-Graham and her colleagues found that the single dose of alcohol at work is associated with autism-related proteins, an inhibitor of the neurotransmitter GABA neurotransmitter from the simulator.


In addition, the team found that these biochemical changes lead to non-depressive behavior for at least 24 hours.


GABA is the most potent depressive neurotransmitter in the human brain. It regulates depression and sedation in many brain tissues and is the key to relaxation.


This study shows that alcohol follows the same biochemical pathways in animal antidepressants, while producing comparable effects to those observed by those who behave.


"More research is needed in this area, but our findings do provide the basis for the natural biology of human instinctive self-medication," Rab-Graham said.


They also define molecular mechanisms that may be a key contributor to alcohol use disorders and the incidence of depression in common, the authors note.

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