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5 Awesome Tips For A No-Experience Resume

Most of us know that for a successful job search, you need a resume that lists experience and education - but what if you do not have a list of relevant work experience? Maybe you are a recent college graduate, leaving parents at home to return to work or someone who wants to change careers. Lack of experience does not have to kill you when you apply for a job. Here are six tips to make your inexperienced resume a little boost so you can get the job you want.

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Credit: Seek/Shutterstock


Start with your skills
Maybe you do not have so many impressive companies and titles, but everyone has the skills. What are you good at? If you are not used to thinking about your own contribution in the sun, ask your family or friends. Are you the person looking for advice? This means you have good people skills and you are a problem solver. Maybe you're always in charge of fundraising - those organizational skills that will make you a valuable employee. Think about this step in a broad sense; you will try to make these skills work in a resume format later on. Now, just take a moment to look at your skills and list a list.

Think outside the cabinet
But none of these skills involve any real work, you say. For your inexperienced resume, think about the positions you can list for the experience. Just because you do not get paid to perform a task does not mean it's less valuable. Have you worked on a research project at the university, or did you have a part-time job? Even if these are not directly related to the work you want, the skills you use to perform these tasks tend to be roughly the same. Take some time to list the tasks or projects you have in your first step related to your skills. Any rewards, speeches or special items you count.


Be Specific
Now comes the tricky part: you need to take all these skills, experience and other things that you have already done in the compartment and refine them to fit your resume. Do not write long paragraphs for your fundraising activities, but try to do that. For example: $ 2,000 was raised in two weeks for the XYZ fundraising project, benefiting ABC schools. Or: Third place at the Science Fair, with 200 students participating. Recruitment officers usually only have time to quickly scan resumes; numbers will pop up on the page. Quantify any skills you have, especially if it shows you somewhere that you add to the bottom line.

Focus on positive
Now that you've put together a list of good skills and any out-of-the-box experience and details, you might be thinking: What do I list first on my resume? Start with your strongest assets. Have you just finished your studies? First, list your education. If you lack education and experience, start with a list called "Qualification Summary" and list your achievements from the first, second and third columns above. Focus on the positive; you have a lot to offer, even if you do not have 9 to 5 titles to show it.

Add personality
If your resume feels a little thin, add a section titled "Interests and hobbies". You may think this has nothing to do with the work, but it shows you what kind of person. Use your cover letter to add some personality to your application as long as you keep your letters and resume professional - do not add your scrapbook samples or photos of your pet. You never know: your hobbies may be just a hiring officer's personal relationship.


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